Diana W. Bianchi, MD
Diana W. Bianchi, MD
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)
Diana W. Bianchi is the Director of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD). Dr. Bianchi oversees an annual budget of approximately $1.7 billion in support of NICHD’s mission to lead research and training to understand human development, improve reproductive health, enhance the lives of children and adolescents, and optimize abilities for all. Dr. Bianchi received her M.D. from Stanford University School of Medicine and her postgraduate training in Pediatrics, Medical Genetics and Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine at Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School. Dr. Bianchi’s research focuses on prenatal genomics with the goal of advancing noninvasive prenatal DNA screening and diagnosis to develop new therapies for genetic disorders that can be administered prenatally.

Prior to NICHD, she spent 23 years at Tufts University School of Medicine, where she was the founding Executive Director of the Mother Infant Research Institute and the Natalie V. Zucker Professor of Pediatrics, Obstetrics, and Gynecology. She is a Past President of the International Society for Prenatal Diagnosis and the Perinatal Research Society. She is a former Director of the American Society for Human Genetics and Council Member of the Society for Pediatric Research (SPR) and American Pediatric Society. She was elected to membership in the Association of American Physicians in 2010 and the National Academy of Medicine in 2013.

Dr. Bianchi received the 2015 Neonatal Landmark Award from the American Academy of Pediatrics, the 2016 Maureen Andrew Award for Mentorship from SPR, and the 2017 Colonel Harland Sanders Award for lifetime achievement in Medical Genetics from the March of Dimes. In 2020, she received an honorary doctorate from the University of Amsterdam and the Health Public Service Visionary Award from the Society for Women’s Health Research. Dr. Bianchi was a finalist for the Samuel J. Heyman Service to America Medals in 2022.

Myles Brown, MD
Myles Brown, MD
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Myles Brown, MD, is Director, Center for Functional Cancer Epigenetics, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Emil Frei III Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School. Dr. Brown’s research is focused on providing a detailed understanding of the factors underlying the hormone dependence of breast and prostate cancers with the goal of developing new therapies and improving outcomes for patients. His lab identified the role of co-activators in steroid receptor action; elucidated the dynamic nature of co-regulator function; and defined steroid receptor cistromes. In 2010, together with Shirley Liu he founded the Center for Functional Cancer Epigenetics at the Dana-Farber with the goal of identifying epigenomic alterations in cancer including those that influence response to endocrine therapy and perturb the tumor immune microenvironment.

Arturo Casadevall, MD, PhD
Arturo Casadevall, MD, PhD
W. Harry Feinstone Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Arturo Casadevall, MD, PhD is a Bloomberg Distinguished Professor and Chair of the W. Harry Feinstone Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. He obtained his B.A. in Chemistry at Queens College of the City University of New York. Previously, he served as Director of the Division of Infectious Diseases at Montefiore Medical Center, the University Hospital and Academic Medical Center for Einstein, from 2000‐2006 and as Chair of the Department of Microbiology and Immunology from 2006‐2014.

Dr. Casadevall received both his M.D. and Ph.D. (biochemistry) degrees from New York University. Subsequently, he completed his internship and residency in internal medicine at Bellevue Hospital in New York. He then completed subspecialty training in infectious diseases at Montefiore and Einstein. The author of over 900 scientific papers, numerous books and book chapters, Dr. Casadevall’s major research interests are in fungal pathogenesis and the mechanisms of antibody action. In the area of biodefense, he has an active research program to understand the mechanisms of antibody‐mediated neutralization of Bacillus anthracis toxins.

In recent years, Dr. Casadevall has become interested in problems with the scientific enterprise and with his collaborators shown that misconduct accounts for the majority of retracted publications. He has suggested a variety of reforms to the way science is done. Dr. Casadevall is the editor‐in‐chief of mBio, the first open access general journal of the American Society of Microbiology and is on the editorial board of several journals including the Journal of Infectious Diseases and the Cell Surface.

He has also served in numerous NIH committees including those that drafted the NIAID Strategic Plan and the Blue-Ribbon Panel on Biodefense Research. He served on the National Academy of Sciences panel that reviewed the science on the FBI investigation of the anthrax terror attacks of 2001 and has served on the NAS Committee of Federal Regulations and Reporting requirements. He has also served as a member of the National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity from 2005‐2014. In 2008, he was recognized by the American Society of Microbiology with the William Hinton Award for mentoring scientists from underrepresented groups. In 2015, Dr. Casadevall was appointed a Commissioner to the National Commission on Forensic Science, the United States Department of Justice. He has served as President of the Medical Mycology Society of America, Chair of American Society for Microbiology Division F, Chair of the American Society for Microbiology Career Development Committee, Co‐Chair of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Board of Scientific Counselors, and currently serves on the Scientific Council/Advisory Board for the Pasteur Institut and VIB Research Institute in Belgium. He is a member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation, American College of Physicians and the Association of American Physicians and was elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Academy of Microbiology. In 2014, he became an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine, in 2017 he was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and in 2022 he was elected to the National Academy of Sciences and also received the Lucille George Award 2022 in Basic Science from the International Society of Human and Animal Mycoses.

Dan Drucker, MD, FRCPC
Dan Drucker, MD, FRCPC
Division of Endocrinology at University of Toronto
Dr. Drucker is an Endocrinologist and Professor of Medicine in the Division of Endocrinology at University of Toronto. He holds the Banting and Best Diabetes Centre-Novo Nordisk Chair in Incretin Biology. His laboratory is based in the Lunenfeld Tanenbaum Research Institute at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto and studies the molecular biology and physiology of the glucagon-like peptides. Dr. Drucker received training in Internal Medicine and Endocrinology from the Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore and the University of Toronto, followed by a fellowship in molecular endocrinology at Massachusetts General Hospital. His discoveries have enabled development of several new therapies for the treatment of diabetes, obesity and intestinal failure. Drucker has received numerous international awards for his translational science and has been elected to Fellowship in the Royal Society (London) and the National Academy of Sciences (USA).

Jonathan A. Epstein, MD
Jonathan A. Epstein, MD
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania
Dr. Epstein graduated from Harvard College in 1983, Harvard Medical School in 1988 and completed his Residency and Fellowship in Medicine and Cardiology at the Brigham and Women's Hospital, where he also completed an HHMI Postdoctoral Fellowship in Genetics. In 1996 he accepted a position as Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of Cardiology at the University of Pennsylvania. From 2006-2015, he served as Chairman of the Department of Cell and Developmental Biology and Scientific Director of the Penn Cardiovascular Institute. He is currently the William Wikoff Smith Professor, Executive Vice Dean and Chief Scientific Officer at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and Senior Vice President and Chief Scientific Officer at the University of Pennsylvania Health System.

Dr. Epstein has been the recipient of numerous awards, including the Sir William Osler Young Investigator Award from the Interurban Clinical Club (2001), the Outstanding Investigator Award from the American Federation for Medical Research (2006) and the Harriet P. Dustan Award for Science as Related to Medicine from the American College of Physicians (2020). He is a member of them Philadelphia College of Physicians, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, American Association of Physicians, Past President of the Interurban Clinical Club, Past President of the American Society for Clinical Investigation and a member of the National Academy of Medicine (previously the Institute of Medicine). He serves on several editorial boards, and is a past Deputy Editor of the Journal of Clinical Investigation. Dr. Epstein was a founding co-director of the Penn Institute for Regenerative Medicine in 2007.

Dr. Epstein’s research has focused on the molecular mechanisms of cardiovascular development and implications for understanding and treating human disease. His group has been at the forefront of utilizing animal models of congenital heart disease to determine genetic and molecular pathways required for cardiac morphogenesis, with implications for pediatric and adult cardiovascular disease. Stem cell, angiogenesis and epigenetic studies have had direct implications for the development of new therapeutic agents for heart failure and myocardial infarction.

Peter J. Hotez, MD, PhD
Peter J. Hotez, MD, PhD
Baylor College of Medicine
Peter J. Hotez, M.D., Ph.D. is Dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine and Professor of Pediatrics and Molecular Virology & Microbiology at Baylor College of Medicine where he is also the Co-director of the Texas Children’s Center for Vaccine Development (CVD) and Texas Children’s Hospital Endowed Chair of Tropical Pediatrics. He is also University Professor at Baylor University, Fellow in Disease and Poverty at the James A Baker III Institute for Public Policy, Senior Fellow at the Scowcroft Institute of International Affairs at Texas A&M University, Faculty Fellow with the Hagler Institute for Advanced Studies at Texas A&M University, and Health Policy Scholar in the Baylor Center for Medical Ethics and Health Policy.

Dr. Hotez is an internationally-recognized physician-scientist in neglected tropical diseases and vaccine development. As co-director of the Texas Children’s CVD, he leads a team and product development partnership for developing new vaccines for hookworm infection, schistosomiasis, leishmaniasis, Chagas disease, and SARS/MERS/SARS-2 coronavirus, diseases affecting hundreds of millions of children and adults worldwide, while championing access to vaccines globally and in the United States.

In December 2021, Dr. Hotez led efforts at the Texas Children’s Center for Vaccine Development to develop a low-cost recombinant protein COVID vaccine for global health, resulting in emergency use authorization in India.

He obtained his undergraduate degree in molecular biophysics from Yale University in 1980 (phi beta kappa), followed by a Ph.D. degree in biochemistry from Rockefeller University in 1986, and an M.D. from Weil Cornell Medical College in 1987. Dr. Hotez has authored more than 600 original papers and is the author of five single-author books, including Forgotten People, Forgotten Diseases (ASM Press); Blue Marble Health: An Innovative Plan to Fight Diseases of the Poor amid Wealth (Johns Hopkins University Press); Vaccines Did Not Cause Rachel’s Autism (Johns Hopkins University Press); and Preventing the Next Pandemic: Vaccine Diplomacy in a Time of Anti-science (Johns Hopkins University Press).
Dr. Hotez served previously as President of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene and he is founding Editor-in-Chief of PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases. In 2006 at the Clinton Global Initiative he co-founded the Global Network for Neglected Tropical Diseases to provide access to essential medicines for hundreds of millions of people. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine (Public Health Section) and the American Academy of Arts & Sciences (Public Policy Section). In 2014-16, he served in the Obama Administration as US Envoy, focusing on vaccine diplomacy initiatives between the US Government and countries in the Middle East and North Africa. In 2018, he was appointed by the US State Department to serve on the Board of Governors for the US Israel Binational Science Foundation, and is frequently called upon frequently to testify before US Congress. He has served on infectious disease task forces for two consecutive Texas Governors. For these efforts in 2017 he was named by FORTUNE Magazine as one of the 34 most influential people in health care, while in 2018 he received the Sustained Leadership Award from Research!America. In 2022 Hotez and his colleague Dr. Maria Elena Bottazzi were nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize for “their work to develop and distribute a low-cost COVID-19 vaccine to people of the world without patent limitation.”

Most recently as both a vaccine scientist and autism parent, he has led national efforts to defend vaccines and to serve as an ardent champion of vaccines going up against a growing national “antivax” threat. In 2019, he received the Award for Leadership in Advocacy for Vaccines from the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. In 2021 he was recognized by scientific leadership awards from the AAMC (Association of American Medical Colleges) and the AMA (American Medical Association), in addition to being recognized by the Anti-Defamation League with its annual Popkin Award for combating antisemitism. Dr. Hotez appears frequently on television (including BBC, CNN, Fox News, and MSNBC), radio, and in newspaper interviews (including the New York Times, USA Today, Washington Post, and Wall Street Journal).

Ashish K. Jha, M.D.
Ashish K. Jha, M.D.
White House COVID-19 Response Coordinator
A practicing physician, Ashish K. Jha, M.D. was appointed as Coordinator of the COVID-19 Response by President Biden. In his former role, he served as dean of the School of Public Health at Brown University. He is recognized globally as an expert on pandemic preparedness and response as well as on domestic and global health policy. Jha has led groundbreaking research around Ebola and has been a trusted voice on the COVID-19 response, leading national and international analysis of key issues and advising state and federal policy makers.

He joined Brown in 2020 after leading the Harvard Global Health Institute and teaching at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Harvard Medical School.

Jha has published more than 250 original research publications in leading medical and health policy journals and is a frequent contributor to a range of public media. His research has focused primarily on the impact of public health policy on health outcomes and healthcare spending both domestically and globally.

He has practiced for nearly two decades at Veterans Affairs hospitals, providing direct clinical care to Veterans.

Born in Pursaulia, Bihar, India, Jha moved to Toronto, Canada, in 1979 and to the United States in 1983. He graduated magna cum laude from Columbia University with a B.A. in economics, and received his M.D. from Harvard Medical School, and a Masters in Public Health from the Harvard School of Public Health. He has been a member of the National Academy of Medicine since 2013.

William G. Kaelin, Jr., MD
William G. Kaelin, Jr., MD
Harvard Medical School Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Howard Hughes Medical Institute
William Kaelin is the Sidney Farber Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Senior Physician in Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator. He obtained his undergraduate and M.D. degrees from Duke University and completed his training in Internal Medicine at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, where he served as chief medical resident. He was a clinical fellow in Medical Oncology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and later a postdoctoral fellow in David Livingston’s laboratory, during which time he was a McDonnell Scholar.

A Nobel Laureate, Dr. Kaelin received the 2019 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Medicine, the American Society of Clinical Investigation, and the American College of Physicians. He previously served on the National Cancer Institute Board of Scientific Advisors, the AACR Board of Trustees, and the Institute of Medicine National Cancer Policy Board. He is a recipient of the Paul Marks Prize for cancer research from the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center; the Richard and Hinda Rosenthal Prize from the AACR; the Doris Duke Distinguished Clinical Scientist award; the 2010 Canada International Gairdner Award; ASCI’s Stanley
J. Korsmeyer Award; the Scientific Grand Prix of the Foundation Lefoulon-Delalande; the Wiley Prize in Biomedical Sciences; the Steven C. Beering Award; the AACR Princess Takamatsu Award; the ASCO Science of Oncology Award; the Helis Award; the Albert Lasker Basic Medical Research Prize; the Massry Prize; the Harriet P. Dustan Award for Science as Related to Medicine from the American College of Physicians.

Dr. Kaelin’s research seeks to understand how, mechanistically, mutations affecting tumor-suppressor genes cause cancer. His laboratory is currently focused on studies of the VHL, RB-1, and p53 tumor suppressor genes. His long-term goal is to lay the foundation for new anticancer therapies based on the biochemical functions of such proteins. His work on the VHL protein helped to motivate the eventual successful clinical testing of VEGF inhibitors for the treatment of kidney cancer. Moreover, this line of investigation led to new insights into how cells sense and respond to changes in oxygen, and thus has implications for diseases beyond cancer, such as anemia, myocardial infarction, and stroke. His group also showed that leukemic transformation by mutant IDH was reversible, setting the stage for the development and approval of mutant IDH inhibitors, and discovered how thalidomide-like drugs kill myeloma cells by degrading two otherwise undruggable transcription factors.

Daniel P. Kelly, MD
Daniel P. Kelly, MD
University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine
Dan Kelly is the Willard and Rhoda Ware Professor of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine. He trained in Medicine and Cardiology at Barnes Hospital, then joined the faculty of Washington University School of Medicine where he served as Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics, Chief of the Cardiovascular Division, and the founding Director of the Center for Cardiovascular Research. In 2008, Dr. Kelly assumed the role of founding Scientific Director for the Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute in Florida followed by his recruitment to serve as Director of the Penn Cardiovascular Institute.

Dr. Kelly’s research interests stem from an early fascination with rare inborn errors in energy metabolism that cause childhood sudden death and heart failure. He defined the genetic basis for a common inborn error in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, work that led to the development of practical newborn screening tests. Thereafter, he became interested in how similar derangements in cardiac fuel and energy metabolism contribute to acquired forms of heart failure in adults. The Kelly laboratory has recently identified several candidate therapeutic targets to re-balance mitochondrial metabolism in heart failure.

Dr. Kelly served as an Associate Editor for The Journal of Clinical Investigation and is currently on many Editorial Boards. He is a member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation (Council, 2002-05), the American Association of Physicians as current president, and is a recipient of the AHA Distinguished Achievement Award and Basic Research Prize.

Cato T. Laurencin, MD, PhD, BSE
Cato T. Laurencin, MD, PhD, BSE
University of Connecticut
Cato T. Laurencin, M.D., Ph.D. earned his B.S.E. in Chemical Engineering from Princeton, his M.D., Magna Cum Laude, from the Harvard Medical School, and his Ph.D. in Biochemical Engineering/Biotechnology from M.I.T.

He is the pioneer of the field of Regenerative Engineering.

In receiving the Spingarn Medal, he was named the world’s foremost engineer-physician-scientist. Dr. Laurencin pioneered the novel use of polymeric biomaterials for treating musculoskeletal conditions. In recognition of his breakthrough achievements, the American Institute of Chemical Engineers created the Cato T. Laurencin Regenerative Engineering Founder’s Award.

Dr. Laurencin is the first surgeon in history elected to membership in the National Academy of Medicine, the National Academy of Engineering, and the National Academy of Sciences. He is the first person to receive both one of the oldest/highest awards of the National Academy of Medicine (the Walsh McDermott Medal) and the oldest/highest award of the National Academy of Engineering (the Simon Ramo Founder’s Award). The American Association for the Advancement of Science awarded him the Philip Hauge Abelson Prize given ‘for signal contributions to the advancement of science in the United States’.

Dr. Laurencin is the recipient of the National Medal of Technology and Innovation, America’s highest honor for technological achievement, awarded by President Barack Obama in ceremonies at the White House.

Mitchell A. Lazar, MD, PhD
Mitchell A. Lazar, MD, PhD
Perelman School of Medicine University of Pennsylvania

Richard P. Lifton, MD, PhD
Richard P. Lifton, MD, PhD
The Rockefeller University

Carol Prives, PhD
Carol Prives, PhD
Columbia University
Carol Prives is the DaCosta Professor of Biological Sciences at Columbia University. She and her group have elucidated aspects of the structure and function of the p53 protein especially as it relates to its roles as a transcriptional activator. In parallel, her group has examined how cancer related mutant forms of p53 regulate tumorigenesis. Work from her laboratory has also illuminated the functions of the key p53 negative regulators, Mdm2 and MdmX. Dr Prives has received several honors including being named an American Cancer Society Research Professor, election to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Medicine, the National Academy of Sciences, the AACR Academy and the Royal Society. She has presented numerous named lectures and has received awards including the NCI Rosalind E Franklin Award for Women in Science, the Paul Jansen Prize in Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, the AACR-Women in Cancer Research Charlotte Friend Memorial Lectureship Award, the Ernst W Bertner Award from MD Anderson and the AACR GHA-Clowes Award. Dr Prives has also received an honorary doctorate from McGill University, her alma mater.

Christine Seidman, MD
Christine Seidman, MD
Harvard Medical School
Christine Seidman is the Thomas W. Smith Professor of Medicine and Genetics at Harvard Medical School, an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and Director of the Cardiovascular Genetics Service at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. She was an undergraduate at Harvard College and received a M.D. from George Washington University School of Medicine. Dr. Seidman served as an intern and resident in Internal Medicine at John Hopkins Hospital and received subspecialty training in cardiology at the Massachusetts General Hospital.

Dr. Seidman has pioneered the discovery of the genetic basis for heart muscle disorders, including hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies and congenital heart disease. By engineering human mutations into iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes and mouse models she has identified molecular mechanisms and therapeutic targets. Her work has enabled development of clinical gene-based diagnostics, early and accurate identification of at-risk individuals, and pre-emptive interventions to limit the progression and devastating outcomes associated with these disorders.

Dr. Seidman is the recipient of the American Heart Association Basic Science Prize and Joseph A. Vita Award, the American Society for Clinical Investigation Award, the Pasarow Foundation Award in Cardiovascular Research, the Bristol-Myers Squibb Award for Distinguished Achievement in Cardiovascular Research, the Institut de France Fondation Lefoulon-Delalande Grand Prix for Science Award and the European Society of Cardiology Gold Medal. She is a member of U.S. National Academy of Medicine and the National Academy of Science.

Rochelle P. Walensky, MD, MPH
Rochelle P. Walensky, MD, MPH
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Administrator of the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry
Rochelle P. Walensky, MD, MPH, is the Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Administrator of the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. She is an influential scholar whose pioneering research has helped advance the national and global response to HIV/AIDS. Dr. Walensky is also a well-respected expert on the value of testing and treatment of deadly viruses.

Dr. Walensky served as Chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases at Massachusetts General Hospital from 2017-2020 and Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School from 2012-2020. She served on the frontline of the COVID-19 pandemic and conducted research on vaccine delivery and strategies to reach underserved communities.

Dr. Walensky is recognized internationally for her work to improve HIV screening and care in South Africa and nationally recognized for motivating health policy and informing clinical trial design and evaluation in a variety of settings.

She is a past Chair of the Office of AIDS Research Advisory Council at the National Institutes of Health, Chair-elect of the HIV Medical Association, and previously served as an advisor to both the World Health Organization and the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS.
Originally from Maryland, Dr. Walensky received her Bachelor of Arts from Washington University in St. Louis, her Doctor of Medicine from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, and her Masters in Public Health from the Harvard School of Public Health.